Teaching and Copyright

When academics teach they call upon different parts of the law to share material with students. The process of photocopying or scanning and uploading to LEO for students is not a fair dealing for research and study, it is a professional educational activity.

As a professional education activity other parts of the Copyright Act 1968 are relied upon in undertaking the teaching process. Copyright is context based. This is important because what you want to do with already created material is as important as the material itself. This page focuses on material copied and made available to students, and highlight the differences between the formats of material.

Copyright materials used in the activity of teaching is likely to be wide and varied, from traditional textbooks and journal articles to images, photos, YouTube videos, broadcasts and specialised software programs. See Copyright Basics as a reminder of what is copyright material.

This page provides general ACU information regarding copyright in the learning and teaching process. Always check with your Faculty for preferred methods of attribution and any additional processes to meet legal copyright requirements.

See Quick Guides:

Images

Images are protected by copyright, they can be found in books, journals, posters, postcards, magazines, internet, PowerPoint slides and a host of places.

Images include things such as photographs, diagrams, plans, fonts, line drawings, work of art, graphic art, cartoons, tattoos, and sculptures. You can have image within an image, such as an artwork contained within a photo. In Australia, a painter will own the copyright in their painting, and a photographer will own the copyright in the photo of the painting. To use the photo you would need permission of both the painter and the photographer. ACU has implemented a range of options for Academics to use images in their teaching materials legally.

Databases

The library has several databases of images to search through and select.

Part VB

ACU pays for and relies on a Part VB licence to enable the copying of text and images for educational purposes. With certain conditions, any image can be located on the internet, book, journal, and then used at ACU.

See information sheet to find out more

Public Domain

The public domain is the term used for material where the copyright has expired or the copyright owner has declared their material into the public domain. Material can be used freely by anybody for any purpose. Public domain images can be found all over the internet, a good starting place is the public domain pictures website.

Creative Commons

Copyright owners may choose to release some or all of their rights through creative commons licences, making their images freely available to use for certain purposes. Creative commons images can be found all over the internet, a good starting place is the Creative Commons Fact Sheet.

ACU recommends public domain and creative commons are used when possible, as there is no risk of copyright infringement and no cost associated with their use.

Images Obligations

As part of using images under any of the options, the obligation is to reference where the material came from. ACU requires attribution, as does the law. Check with your Faculty if they have a preferred method of attribution. A citation list or bibliography, a credits list at the end of a video, verbal thanks at the end of a recital or music program. A reference slide at the end of a PowerPoint, clickable link under the image are all considered suitable acknowledgement.

Images used under Part VB also have a legal requirement to include a legal notice

COMMONWEALTH OF AUSTRALIA

Copyright Regulations 1969

WARNING

This material has been reproduced and communicated to you by or on behalf of Australian Catholic University pursuant to Part VB of the Copyright Act 1968 (the Act).

The material in this communication may be subject to copyright under the Act.  Any further reproduction or communication of this material by you may be the subject of copyright protection under the Act.

Do not remove this notice.

Audio-visual

Audio-visual material is protected by copyright, and can be found on DVD’s, recorded from broadcasts (television), or on the internet (TV-catch up, vimeo, YouTube).

Audio-visual material contains multiple copyright materials depending upon the topic, scripts, interviews, music, animations, performances, and therefore can have multiple copyright owners.

An educational exception under copyright is that it is always ok to play audio-visual material in a physical classroom. It may not be ok, to record that video as part of a lecture capture system.

Databases

The library has audio-visual databases of audio-visual material to search through and select.

Broadcast

ACU pays for a Part VA or Screenrights licence to enable Lecturers to use anything that has been broadcast on television (free to air or pay) or radio (recorded or podcast).

Lecturers can record the material themselves, source podcasts, get the library to source an off-air recording from a third party or use one of the databases of broadcasts like EduTV or TV News.

See information sheet to find out more

Creative Commons

Copyright owners may choose to release some or all of their rights through creative commons licences, making their video freely available to use for certain purposes. Creative commons videos can be found all over the internet, a good starting place can be the Creative Commons fact sheet.

YouTube

A word on YouTube: it has become a popular site to source quick and easy audio-visual material, so special mention is needed. YouTube is a database containing audio-visual materials from all sorts of sources. Broadcasts uploaded to YouTube by the broadcaster becomes broadcasts. Users upload their own material and then choose either creative commons or all rights reserved. You need to check what the uploader has chosen to know if you can copy it (including into recorded lectures).  Also note YouTube pays licences to enable uploaders to use music in their videos. See the You Tube Copyright page for further information.

Audio visual material Obligations

As part of using audio-visual material under any of the options, the obligation is to reference where the material came from. ACU requires attribution, as does the law. Check with your Faculty if it has a preferred method of attribution. A citation list or bibliography, a credits list at the end of a video, verbal thanks at the end of a recital or music program. A reference slide at the end of a PowerPoint, clickable link under the image are all considered suitable acknowledgement.

Audio-visual material copied and made available online under Part VA or Screenrights also have a legal requirement to include a legal notice

COMMONWEALTH OF AUSTRALIA

Copyright Regulations 1969

WARNING

This material has been copied and communicated to you by or on behalf of Australian Catholic University pursuant to Part VA of the Copyright Act 1968 (the Act).

The material in this communication may be subject to copyright under the Act. Any further copying or communication of this material by you may be the subject of copyright protection under the Act.
Do not remove this notice.

Audio

Audio includes music and recorded voice and is protected by copyright, and can be found on CD’s, recorded from radio broadcasts, or on the internet.

Databases

The library has audio databases to search.

Broadcast

ACU pays for a Part VA or Screenrights licence to enable Lecturers to use any audio content that has been broadcast on radio (recorded or podcast).

Lecturers can record the material themselves, source the podcast, or get the library to source an off-air recording from a third party.

Broadcast obligations

Audio material used under Part VA also have a legal requirement to include a legal notice

COMMONWEALTH OF AUSTRALIA

Copyright Regulations 1969

WARNING

This material has been copied and communicated to you by or on behalf of Australian Catholic University pursuant to Part VA of the Copyright Act 1968 (the Act).

The material in this communication may be subject to copyright under the Act. Any further copying or communication of this material by you may be the subject of copyright protection under the Act.
Do not remove this notice.

See information sheet to find out more

Creative Commons

Copyright owners may choose to release some or all of their rights through creative commons licences, making their music recordings or audio freely available to use for certain purposes. Creative commons material can be found all over the internet, see the Creative Commons Fact Sheets.

Music Licences

ACU has purchased a number of music licences to enable use of music at the university.

Voluntary Music Licence

The music licence permits universities to use musical works and sound recordings in ways such as streamed or placed in LEO. The licence applies to musical works and sound recordings in the repertoire of the music collecting societies - APRA, AMCOS, PPCA and ARIA. The licence only applies to music legally obtained.

Voluntary music licence Obligations

There is a contractual requirement to include a notice if using music under Music Licence.

“This recording has been made by the Australian Catholic University under the express terms of an educational licence between it, AMCOS and ARIA and may only be used as authorised by Australian Catholic University pursuant to the terms of that licence; and (i) the title of each musical work; (ii) the name of each composer, lyricist and arranger; and (iii) if the recording contains an ARIA Sound Recording, the artist/group name and the name of the record company or record label.”

See information sheet to find out more

Word of Life 5294

This music licence permits the university to reproduce full scores of music for our musicians and choirs.

See information sheet to find out more

Word of life 1700

This music licence permits the university to reproduce words and melody for congregational use.

See information sheet to find out more

Word of Life Obligations

As part of using audio material under any of the options, the obligation is to reference where the material came from. It is and ACU and legal requirement that works be attributed. Check with your Faculty if they have a preferred method of attribution. A citation list or bibliography, a credits list at the end of a video, verbal thanks at the end of a recital or music program. A reference slide at the end of a PowerPoint, clickable link under the image are all considered suitable acknowledgement.

Written – books – journals – websites - etc

Written material is protected by copyright. It can be books, journals, newspapers, pamphlets, magazines, internet, PowerPoints and available from a host of sources.

Databases

The library has a wide range of databases on topic with all required copyright sorted.

Part VB

ACU pays for a Part VB licence to enable the copying of text for educational purposes. There are strict amount limits for the university under this licence.

  • 10% of the number of pages (if its text or sheet music and is more than 10 pages long)
  • One chapter (if its divided into chapters) either printed or electronic
  • An article from a newspaper, magazine or journal (or more than one if it is for the same course of research or study)
  • 10% of the number of words in an electronic work (e.g. Internet)

ACU operates a University Copyright Database to ensure that we meet the Part VB compliance requirements. Instructors should ensure all digitised versions of text works are in the database to meet compliance under the licence.

See information sheet to find out more

Public Domain

The public domain is the term used for material where the copyright has expired or the copyright owner has declared their material into the public domain. Material can be used freely by anybody for any purpose. Public domain written works can be found all over the internet, Project Gutenberg is a good starting place.

Creative Commons

Copyright owners may choose to release some or all of their rights through creative commons licences, making their works freely available to use for certain purposes. Creative commons material can be found all over the internet, see the Creative Commons Fact Sheets.

Text works Obligations

As part of using texts under any of the options, the obligation is to reference where the material came from. ACU and legislation requires this.  Check with your Faculty if they have a preferred method of attribution. A citation list or bibliography, a credits list at the end of a video, verbal thanks at the end of a recital or music program. A reference slide at the end of a PowerPoint, clickable link under the image are all considered suitable acknowledgement.

Written material used under Part VB also have a legal requirement to include a legal notice

COMMONWEALTH OF AUSTRALIA

Copyright Regulations 1969

WARNING

This material has been reproduced and communicated to you by or on behalf of Australian Catholic University pursuant to Part VB of the Copyright Act 1968 (the Act).

The material in this communication may be subject to copyright under the Act.  Any further reproduction or communication of this material by you may be the subject of copyright protection under the Act.

Do not remove this notice.

When creating a Reading List (Physical or in LEO) please refer to the Reading List in LEO Guide.

Page last updated: 21 Feb 2017

Short url: http://library.acu.edu.au/1145052